Senior Living Community

You may have heard there is a senior living community proposed for our neighborhood. The Glen at Scripps Ranch Senior Living Project is a Continuing Care Retirement Community (CCRC). The SRCA Newsletter editor, SRCA President Bob Ilko, Scripps Ranch Planning Group chair Wally Wulfeck, and Miramar Ranch North Planning Committee chair Lorayne Burley met with the project’s developer. Rick Aschenbrenner, managing partner of Continuing Life Communities (CLC) and Dave Harbour, project manager, talked about the proposed development.

Location and Project Details

It will be at the southwest corner of Chabad Center Drive and Pomerado Road.

  • 650’ set back from Pomerado Road;
  • CLC is under contract to purchase 53 acres but says 35 will be used;
  • CLC says most of the facility will not be seen from Pomerado Road;
  • 400 independent living units, varying from one-bedroom apartments to three-bedroom villas, with options in between;
  • 50 assisted-living units, some dedicated to memory support; and,
  • A 110-bed Health Center that will include skilled nursing care and a rehab facility.

Until residents of The Glen need the Health Center—CLC estimates that to be 12–14 years—it will be available to the general public. There are no age restrictions for the Health Center.

Who Can Live There?

  • 60+, the age requirement mandated by the state;
  • People who can afford the cost; and,
  • When residents first move into The Glen, they have to be capable of living independently. If their health deteriorates, then they have the option to move into the assisted-living units or the Health Center.

People who live at The Glen do not purchase a home. Residents “purchase”:

  • A place to live;
  • Package of services, according to what a resident chooses; and,
  • Access to an assisted-living facility and skilled nursing Health Center.

Cost

The entrance fee will range from $300,000–$900,000, depending on the unit. Also, there is a monthly fee, ranging from $2,500–$6,000. Residents—or their estates—get at least 75% of the entrance fee back when they leave or pass away.

CLC currently is accepting $1,000 refundable deposits that reserve you a place in line when the facility is ready to accept residents. The deposit goes into an escrow account and bears interest for the future resident. CLC must have deposits for at least half the units in order to proceed, according to the state. Since June more than 200 people have put down deposits, most are Scripps Ranch residents.

Traffic

In the conditional use permit application to the city, CLC estimates that the average daily trips (ADT) are 1,880, most of which will be in non-peak hours. To put that into perspective, a typical apartment building built on 53 acres would generate 9,540–12,240 ADTs. Kaiser, which at one time looked into purchasing the Alliant International University site, had estimated that its campus would generate 16,000–18,000 ADT. According to CLC:

  • Approximately 5–10% or residents are not expected to have a vehicle;
  • The Glen will have transportation services, which will include buses, vans, and other vehicles; and,
  • The approximate 300 employees will be scheduled to start and end work at non-peak traffic hours.

Opposition

There is opposition to the project from the group Residents for the Rational Use of the Alliant University Site (RRUAS), which opposed bringing Kaiser to the Alliant site. According to Craig Jones, Scripps Ranch resident and RRUAS member, the extreme intensity of the proposed CLC project is astounding. It also would violate the integrity of our community plan. The concerns include:

  • Traffic—RRUAS claims that CLC’s Traffic Impact Analysis submitted to the city in April 2013 was flawed and that the number of daily trips was substantially understated;
  • Land form and grading—the project plans to grade the entire site, except for a narrowed creek drainage way, in order to make a flat piece of property out of hillside, and unnatural graded slopes will result;
  • Air Quality—short-term from construction traffic; long-term from traffic and site operations; and;
  • Biological/Ecological—there is a wildlife access corridor at the site.

Next Steps

  • The city is expected to release the Draft Environmental Impact Report (EIR) before the end of this year;
  • The developer expects a City Council vote on the project in Apr. 2015;
  • If approved, ground-breaking would occur by the end of 2015; and,
  • Construction will be phased; it will be about two years after building starts before residents can move in.

CLC has an office at 9903 Businesspark Avenue, Suite 104, in Scripps Ranch that features a scaled down model of the proposed project, which is pictured on this Newsletter cover. CLC has four other projects in California, including La Costa Glen in Carlsbad. In addition to building the facilities, the company runs them.

CLC holds information sessions for the public. Visit [www.theglenatscrippsranch.com] for details. The SRCA will bring you developments as they occur.

Our Beloved Buffy was Killed By a Coyote

Scripps Ranch is a community of dog lovers, and we’ve been warned that coyotes are snatching dogs in our area. We are always careful with our three rescue dogs and thought coyotes would be afraid of us.

On Tuesday, Sept. 2, at 6 pm my husband, Paul, took our dogs—Sparky, Buffy, and Scooter—to the city’s water tank site on Meanley Drive, as we have done for year. As Paul was walking the dogs back to the car, about a block from the park, he decided to throw the ball one last time. The dogs ran playfully and Paul heard a yelp. He looked back to see a coyote carrying Buffy by the neck across the street and up a steep hill. Paul ran after them screaming. He was not 10 seconds behind the coyote and Buffy, but they were gone.

When we think about how she died and how doing anything differently could have changed the outcome, it saddens our hearts. Just please be afraid of coyotes. We have spoken to authorities, read reports, and talked to many people in Scripps Ranch and around the county who have lost their pets to coyotes. The numbers are staggering and many go unreported.

A friend told us a Yorkie was killed near Scripps Ranch High School. In North Park there are reports that people have had their dogs ripped from their arms. A family member said a coyote tried to get through his doggie door in Poway. A report states that a 2-year-old was attacked in Los Angeles and the coyote was dragging her away. There are many others.

A study by biologists at the University of California Davis reports once coyotes lose their fear of humans or start behaving aggressively, a health and safety hazard exists. Removing a few coyotes may help as the coyotes need to fear people. Coyotes are territorial and once they find a good feeding ground they will not leave.

We have posted warnings near where Buffy was killed. We plan to pursue solutions to the coyote problem. If you have a story to share or more information, please email me at [[email protected]].

Pam Mott, SR Resident

[Editor’s note: This is the second report by a Scripps Ranch resident of coyotes at the water tank near Meanley Drive. In the September SRCA Newsletter, a resident reported a coyote almost attacked her dog.]

Fall Clean-Up Day and Battery Recycling

Fall Clean-Up Day is on Saturday, Oct. 18, from 8 am to noon. Get rid of your unwanted items at one of two drop-off locations: Business Park parking lot on Meanley Drive; SRCA Community Center parking lot on Cypress Canyon Road. Bring your disposals, but no construction debris, paint, or electronics are accepted. This event is sponsored by your Scripps Ranch Civic Association (SRCA).

This year we are joining with ONE CELL, a battery recycling program. Bring your used alkaline batteries—everyday batteries—to be recycled. Alkaline batteries are not supposed to be thrown in the trash, so this is a great way to get rid of them. ONE CELL will be at the SRCA Community Center from 9 am until noon.

ONE CELL was started three years ago by Anirudh Suri, a Marshall Middle School 8th grader. The SRCA Newsletter featured Anirudh in our July issue. If you missed it, you can find the article at [www.scrippsranch.org/newsletter/current-issue/3053-kid-s-korner.html].